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August 23, 2009
Danish-Swedish-Canadian Expedition reaches the North Pole
The arrival at the North Pole 
The arrival at the North Pole was celebrated in a very traditional way by raising the flags of the countries represented onboard Oden: Denmark, Sweden, Canada, Russia, Germany, USA, Spain, Greenland and Nunavut. After a glass of champagne on the bridge and a group photo on the sea ice in front of Oden, the ship continued its scientific program. Photo: Benjamin Hell.
Enlarge photo
See the group photo from another angle (Photo: Adam Jeppesen)
 
LOMROG II 2009, 5th Field Report

During a cruise in the Arctic Ocean with the Swedish icebreaker Oden, a Danish-Swedish-Canadian expedition reached the geographical North Pole on August 22 at 21:04 (UTC). The aim of the expedition is to collect scientific data for the Danish and Canadian Continental Shelf projects in order to document claims for an extended continental shelf to the north of Greenland and Canada beyond the present 200 nautical mile zone.

The North Pole was covered by 10/10 of sea ice and Oden had to break through partly heavy sea ice as also in the weeks before the arrival at the North Pole.

Read more in the 5th Field Report

July 9, 2009
Read Newsletter 6 - CCGS Hudson cruise 2009 to Labrador Sea, project SIGNAL
Free-air gravity map with the location of the planned lines
Free-air gravity map with the location of the planned refraction seismic lines (bold blue) shown together with the existing reflection seismic lines (red lines). Solid lines are bathymetry contours (contour interval 500 m). The Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is marked as dashed white line.
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The purpose of the CCGS Hudson cruise (project SIGNAL - Seismic Investigations off Greenland, Newfoundland And Labrador) is to collect refraction seismic data in Labrador Sea and the NW Atlantic Ocean that can help support an extension of the continental shelf off Newfoundland, Labrador, and SW Greenland under Article 76 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). The cruise is of mutual interest to both Canada and Denmark. By sharing the ship, equipment, and staff, substantial costs can be saved for the respective Continental Shelf Projects of the two countries. At the same time, the available resources are used more efficiently and the overall quality of the data acquisition is improved.

While the data are collected for the purpose of UNCLOS, there is also a strong scientific interest in the seismic program. For this reason, the data acquisition will be carried out in close cooperation with Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia).

CCGS Hudson will leave Halifax, Nova Scotia, on June 5, 2009 and will return to St. John's, Newfoundland, on July 10, 2009. Data acquisition is planned along five lines.

Equipment
Ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) from the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) and Dalhousie University will be used for the experiment. The latter instruments will be available to the project through a contract between GEUS and Dalhousie University. The total number of available instruments is 24, with 12 OBS each from GSC and Dalhousie.

The seismic source is an airgun array consisting of 12 Sercel G-guns with a volume of 520 cubic inches each. The array is provided by GSC and is anticipated to run with much less maintenance than the old Bolt-gun array.

Sonobuoys will be brought on the ship to have a backup in case of ice conditions that make a deployment of OBS south of Greenland too risky. In addition, sonobuoys can be used to decrease the receiver spacing at critical locations along the other lines.

XTB (Expendable Bathythermograph) probes will be used to determine the water velocity in the study area.

Learn more about the cruise by reading the weekly newsletters written by Thomas Funck, co-chief scientist on the cruise:
Newsletter-1 (pdf-file ~50kb)
Newsletter-2 (pdf-file ~50kb)
Newsletter-3 (pdf-file ~50kb)
Newsletter-4 (pdf-file ~75kb)
Newsletter-5 (pdf-file ~50kb)
Newsletter-6 (pdf-file ~75kb)


April 17, 2009
Arctic Field Trips 2009

Read the newsletters  

Arctic Ocean. A Canadian-Danish project.
Latest newsletter, April 11, 2009

Project Cornerstone
The last newsletter, April 10, 2009



Further reading: Danish-Canadian Bathymetric and Gravimetric Survey of the Arctic Ocean
March 17, 2009
Danish-Canadian Bathymetric and Gravimetric Survey of the Arctic Ocean
The bathymetric survey of the area immediately north of Ellesmere Island and Greenland is an on-ice survey using helicopters as survey platforms. It is a joint operation of the Canadian Hydrographic Service, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Danish Hydrographic Survey. The project operations are planned for the period March 1-April 30, 2009, from a base camp that will be established on the ice near Ward Hunt Island. The camp set up will be staged from Eureka. The planned bathymetric lines will cover the trough between Ellesmere Island and Greenland and Lomonosov Ridge and Alpha Ridge as well as the slopes of Lomonosov Ridge. Soundings will be obtained at regular intervals (2 5 km) along each sounding profile and gravity measurements will also be taken at selected points along each profile.

Planned bathymetric profiles
Planned bathymetric profiles

On-Ice Gravity and Sounding OperationOn-Ice Gravity and Sounding Operation
On-Ice Gravity and Sounding Operation

The project is part of the Danish and Canadian national UNCLOS programmes, aiming to collect the necessary bathymetric and geological data to support extended continental shelf submissions beyond 200 nautical miles. The UNCLOS programme is in Denmark managed by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), and in Canada by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) and the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS).

The 2009 bathymetric survey will be closely coordinated with the airborne gravity and magnetics survey (LOMGRAV ) of the Amundsen Basin, Lomonosov and Alpha Ridges being carried out by the Danish Space Agency and the Geodetic Survey Division, Natural Resources Canada. The bathymetry operations will be carried out from a CHS ice camp at Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, a fuel camp to be established on Lomonosov Ridge and a Danish scientific ice camp north of Greenland and possibly CFS Alert if weather conditions allow. This Ward Hunt ice camp will be base to 5 Bell 206L helicopters and a Twin-Otter, all arranged through the Polar Continental Shelf Project (PCSP). The Science camp will be supported by a Twin Otter chartered from Kenn Borek Air by DTU-Space, with logistics assistance from Defence Research and Development Canada, for details see http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecamp/index.uk.php

The bathymetric survey follows joint Canadian Danish law of the sea projects such as the 2006 LORITA (Lomonosov Ridge Test of Appurtenance) survey and participation in the 2007 LOMROG (Lomonosov Ridge Off Greenland) surveys.

The bathymetric survey will be carried out by 7 hydrographers (5 Canadian, 2 Danish), technical and logistic support staff (6 Canadian, 4 Danish) and an air crew of 11.

Fuel was positioned at Eureka by ship during the summer 2008 and will be flown to the Ward Hunt ice camp by either a DC-3 Turbo or a DHC-6 Buffalo aircraft. Fuel for the Fuel Camp as well as fuel for the Science Camp north of Greenland will be delivered by Twin Otter, probably from fuel currently in Alert. Fuel caches will be set out in the work area by Twin Otter as required.

Danish-Canadian Arctic Ocean Airborne Geophysical Survey (LOMGRAV09) and associated activities

TheLOMGRAV (Lomonosov Ridge airborne gravity survey) is an airborne geophysical survey of the area north of Ellesmere Island and Greenland. LOMGRAV is a joint operation of the Danish National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark (DTU-Space) and Geodetic Survey Division, National Resources Canada (NRCan). The LOMGRAV flight operations are planned for the period March 17-May 15, 2009, using a specially instrumented DC3T long-range aircraft from Ken Borek. The operations will take place from Alert, Eureka and Station Nord, Greenland. These aero-gravity lines will cover the Canadian and Danish sides of Lomonosov Ridge and Alpha Ridge (of interest only to Canada) and the Amundsen Basin (of interest to Denmark).

Borek DC3T C-FMKB at Station Nord, April 2007
Ken Borek DC3T C-FMKB at Station Nord, April 2007

The LOMGRAV operations are part of the Danish and Canadian national UNCLOS programmes, aiming to collect the necessary bathymetric and geological data to support extended continental shelf claims beyond 200 nautical miles. The UNCLOS programme is in Denmark managed by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, and in Canada by the Geological Survey of Canada and the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS).

The 2009 airborne gravity and magnetics programme will be closely coordinated with the simultaneous helicopter-based bathymetric and gravity survey of the Ellesmere Island / North Greenland continental shelf region, carried out by CHS in cooperation with the Danish Hydrographic Survey and DTU-Space. The bathymetry operations will be carried out from a CHS ice camp at Ward Hunt Ice Shelf and a Danish scientific ice camp north of Greenland. This ice camp is supported by a Twin-Otter chartered from Ken Borek by DTU-Space, and logistics assistance from Defence Research Establishment, Canada, for details see ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecamp/index.uk.php.

The airborne gravity survey operations follows many years of activities in arctic gravity field surface and airborne surveys by DTU-Space, GSD, and CHS. Earlier joint field activites include the airborne gravity survey of Foxe Basin by DTU-Space (then called KMS) and GSD in 2002. Two gravimeters will be used on the aircraft: Lacoste and Romberg S-99 (provided by DTU-Space) and LCR SL-1 (provided by NRCan). Numerous GPS receivers will be used for aircraft positioning, with temporary base stations at main airports (Alert, Eureka, Station Nord), and additionally taking advantage of permanent GPS stations operated by NRCan and DTU-Space for precise positioning. Airborne survey accuracy better than 2 mGal at 7-8 km resolution is the target for the survey.

Magnetic measurements will be made with a SWARM satellite vector magnetometer and a Geometric G823A total field magnetometer. The permanent magnetic observatories of NRCan and DMI (Denmark) will be used for improved magnetometer processing.

The LOMGRAV survey will be carried out by 3 scientists (2 Danish, 1 Canadian), and an air crew of 3. Total planned flight hours for the survey is around 180 hr in the period from the middle of March to the middle of May.

Planned flight tracks
Planned flight tracks for the DC3T geophysical survey. Survey flights are low level (1000 ft).



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